Astro-events and stargazing sites

We’ve been beefing up our astronomy resources of late, adding quite a few events to our calendar and stargazing sites to our maps.

Craters of the Moon
Craters of the Moon National Monument in Idaho is one of the IDA’s International Dark-sky Parks. Photo: US National Park Service

We were inspired to add some stargazing sites by a recent article on the Travel Awaits website. “The 7 Most Incredible Stargazing Sites In The U.S.” by Juanita Pike did not include any Northwest locations, but we went through the International Dark-Sky Association‘s list of dark sky places and added those in our region to our stargazing site maps. We did hop out of the Northwest, barely, for one of them. The frighteningly named Massacre Rim Wilderness Study Area is a certified IDA International Dark Sky Sanctuary just south of the Oregon border in northwestern Nevada.

The maps have grown to have quite a few sites on them. The northwest map is up to about 70, and the Seattle-area map has a stargazer’s dozen.

Astronomy events

Our events calendar is a pretty robust listing of astronomy events in the region. It’s helpful that we can pull events directly from the calendars of several different organizations, including the Seattle, Tacoma, Palouse, and Island County astronomical societies. Some others take a little more legwork. For example, we recently discovered a listing of events about exoplanets that will be running at the Jefferson County Library through early October, and the Southern Oregon Skywatchers shared a list of pending events in their neck of the woods.

Destination: Moon

Apollo 11 Command Module Columbia
The Apollo 11 command module “Columbia” will be at the Museum of Flight through Sept. 2. Photo: Greg Scheiderer.

One of the coolest events of the year is about the come to an end. The Destination: Moon exhibit about the Apollo 11 mission has been at the Museum of Flight since April and will be closing next week, September 2. The Apollo 11 command module “Columbia” is the centerpiece of the exhibit, but there are a great many other interesting items on display as well. (Check out our article about the exhibit when it was in St. Louis last year, and our preview of the MOF version.)

For the final days of Destination: Moon the museum will offer extended hours and discount pricing. Normal hours for the museum are 10 a.m. until 5 p.m. daily. From August 28 through September 2 they’ll stay open from 5-9 p.m. and admission will be discounted during those late hours: $15 for adults and seniors and $10 for youth. Destination: Moon is a separate, $10 ticket; you have to arrive at or after 5 p.m. to qualify for the discount.

We always say that we comb the Internet for astronomy events so that you don’t have to! Please feel free to share any events by your club or organization.

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