Tag Archives: Apollo 11

Seattle Astronomy talks Apollo anniversary at Tacoma libraries

Moonwalk talks

Greg gave the first of his series of talks about Apollo 11 June 29 at the Kobetich Branch of Tacoma Public Library.

Seattle Astronomy is doing our small part in celebrating  the 50th anniversary of Apollo 11 and the first human landing on the Moon. Greg Scheiderer will give six talks as part of the Tacoma Public Library system’s summer reading program.

The talks, titled “Moon Walk: Apollo 11 and a Man on the Moon,” will explore the extraordinary shared experiences of the Apollo missions, look at the history that got us step-by-step up to the giant leap, share some of the iconic photography of Apollo, and, since it’s the summer reading program, offer a list of Apollo readings for adults and kids alike.

The first talk was given on Saturday, June 29, 2019 at the library’s Kobetich Branch. The rest of the schedule is as follows:

You can also find schedule information on our calendar, in our Facebook events section, and on the library’s summer reading club events calendar. Come out and join us for a fun look back at Apollo 11!

Here’s our Apollo reading list!

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Apollo 11 50th anniversary reading list

I’m giving a series of six talks this summer at various branches of Tacoma Public Library about the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 mission and the first humans to walk on the Moon. It’s part of the library’s summer reading club. My talk includes some suggested reading about Apollo. Here’s what I recommend:

A lot of the material for my talk came from James Donovan‘s excellent book Shoot for the Moon: The Space Race and the extraordinary Voyage of Apollo 11 (Little, Brown and Company, 2019). Apollo 11 command module pilot Michael Collins calls the book “The best book on Apollo that I have read.”

Shoot for the Moon takes us on a tour of the space race from Sputnik up through the Apollo missions. Marvelously detailed and highly accessible, I could hardly put it down. It’s a marvelous chronicle of this great adventure.

Amazon

Tacoma Public Library

Seattle Public Library


Rod Pyle‘s First on the Moon: The Apollo 11 50th Anniversary Experience (Sterling, 2019) includes a forward by the mission’s Buzz Aldrin, second man to walk on the Moon. It’s a beautifully illustrated volume that is a fitting commemoration of Apollo 11.

Amazon

Tacoma Public Library (N/A)

Seattle Public Library


Charles Fishman‘s One Giant Leap: The Impossible Mission That Flew Us to the Moon (somebody, 2019) focuses on many of the people behind the scenes—technicians, engineers, scientists—who made the Moon landing possible. About 400,000 people in all worked on some aspect of the Apollo missions.

Fishman gave a talk about the book June 28 at Town Hall Seattle but unfortunately I wasn’t able to attend. The book is next on my nightstand, though.

Amazon

Tacoma Public Library

Seattle Public Library


David Whitehouse‘s Apollo 11: The Inside Story (Icon Books, 2019) is based on the author’s interviews with a host of astronauts, NASA personnel, politicians, and other insiders to tell the tale about how Apollo came about.

Amazon

Tacoma Public Library (N/A)

Seattle Public Library (N/A)

 


Richard Maurer‘s Destination Moon: The Remarkable and Improbable Voyage of Apollo 11 (Roaring Book Press, 2019) goes back in time. While most tales about the space race start with Sputnik, Maurer begins with fighter pilots in World War II. He traces the origins of the Apollo program to a few exceptional soldiers, a Nazi engineer, and a young eager man who would become president.

Amazon

Tacoma Public Library

Seattle Public Library


The Space Race: The Journey to the Moon and Beyond (DK Children, 2019) by Sarah Cruddas is targeted for kids from ages 6–9 and takes them from the race to the Moon to the future and the possibility of perhaps one day living on Mars.

The Space Race includes a forward by Eileen Collins, the first women to be commander of a space shuttle mission.

Amazon

Tacoma Public Library

Seattle Public Library


Two books by John M. Logsdon, founder and long-time director of the Space Policy Institute at George Washington University, wrap up our list. They’re not new, but both offer interesting discussions of the public policy debates behind the Space Race and how the decisions changed the future of U.S. space exploration.

John F. Kennedy and the Race to the Moon (Palgrave Studies in the History of Science and Technology, 2010) and After Apollo?: Richard Nixon and the American Space Program (Palgrave Studies in the History of Science and Technology, 2015) are great reads for those interested in public policy and how challenging decisions are made. The books are relevant now as we observe the anniversary of Apollo, and as we consider the pros and cons of a return to the Moon and possible future missions to Mars.

Check out our 2015 article about Logsdon’s discussion of the future of space exploration given at that winter’s meeting of the American Astronomical Society.


Books marked at N/A at the library branches were not listed in their catalogs as of June 30, 2019. They may be on the way, as most of the titles are fresh off the presses. If you purchase from Amazon through the links above, a small percentage of the sale comes to Seattle Astronomy at no cost to you. This helps support our work on astronomy journalism.

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Destination Moon exhibit opens tomorrow at Museum of Flight

Apollo 11 command module Columbia

Apollo 11 command module Columbia. Photo: Eric Long, National Air and Space Museum, Smithsonian Institution

The long-awaited exhibit Destination Moon: The Apollo 11 Mission, opens April 13 at The Museum of Flight. The centerpiece of the exhibit is the mission’s command module Columbia, which is on the last leg of a two-year, four-city journey that is the historic spacecraft’s first since being parked at the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum in Washington, D.C. in 1971. The Columbia took astronauts Neil Armstrong, Buzz Aldrin, and Michael Collins to the Moon for the first Moon landing. The exhibit will be here through September 2, including the date of the 50th anniversary of the giant leap, July 20, 2019.

While some common elements of the exhibit have traveled to all four cities—Destination Moon stopped in Houston, St. Louis, and Pittsburgh prior to its Seattle trip—each museum has been able to put its own spin on the artifacts. At the Museum of Flight, Destination Moon represents an expansion of the Apollo exhibit that opened in May two years ago. (Here’s our article about the exhibit.) It’s here the the Museum of Flight has an edge, with the exhibit including two enormous F-1 engines that powered the launch of Apollo missions. Other museum artifacts are also included, as is a gallery about the legacy of Seattle-area industry, astronauts and engineers to the space program.

Apollo 11 Columbia command module

Your correspondent with the Apollo 11 command module Columbia in August 2018 at the St. Louis Science Center. Photo: Greg Scheiderer

Visitors can get pretty close to Columbia, but they can’t go inside. However, they can do so virtually through an interactive 3-D tour created from the Smithsonian’s high-resolution scans of the interior of the spacecraft.

The exhibit promises to be extremely popular. A free preview for museum members last weekend was well attended, and a host of special events for the first weekend are likely to draw many visitors. We were fortunate to see the exhibit in St. Louis last summer; it was near the end of the run and it wasn’t at all crowded. Waiting might be a good option if seeing it early and often isn’t a big deal for you!

The Columbia is a big deal artifact. I spent hours with it in St. Louis and a good bit of time at the member preview this week. Don’t miss this great opportunity to see a super cool piece of space history!

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Destination Moon exhibit taking shape at Museum of Flight

Helmet and gloves

The helmet and gloves used by Buzz Aldrin when he walked on the Moon, from the Destination Moon exhibit in St. Louis. Photo: Greg Scheiderer.

With less than a month to go until its opening, the Destination Moon exhibit about the Apollo 11 mission is taking shape at the Museum of Flight. Museum staff announced in a news release this week that the helmet and gloves used by astronaut Buzz Aldrin during his walk on the Moon have been installed in the space. The centerpiece of the exhibit is the Apollo 11 command module Columbia, but it will feature many other artifacts of the historic mission.

I saw the exhibit when it was in St. Louis last summer (story here) and it was great. It opens at the Museum of Flight April 13 and runs through September 2, a stretch of dates that includes the 50th anniversary of the July 20, 1969 “giant leap for mankind.”

There will be some differences in the exhibit from when it was in St. Louis. For example, the Museum of Flight release notes that the helmet and gloves display will include a magnifying glass so that museum visitors can read the to-do list on Aldrin’s glove reminding him of his tasks during the moonwalk. A key item on the list: get a photograph of a boot print on the Moon!

More helmet and gloves

Shelley Sterns-Blackburn, ELY, Inc, and Lisa Young, Conservator at National Air and Space Museum make some final adjustments to spacesuit gloves worn by Buzz Aldrin while on the surface of the Moon. Aldrin’s helmet and visor are in place on the left. Photo Ted Huetter/The Museum of Flight.

Tickets for all dates of the exhibit are now on sale on the Museum of Flight website. Tickets are $10, or $5 for museum members, and must be purchased in addition to museum general admission, which is $25 for adults, $21 for seniors, and $16 for youth. Kids under 4 years of age are admitted free.

In addition, there is a free member preview of the exhibit scheduled for Sunday, April 7, which sounds like an excellent reason to join up today. Several free days are planned during the run of the exhibit, though no details on those have yet been published.

When I saw the exhibit at the St. Louis Science Center I went on a weekday afternoon and there were no lines or crowds; I just walked up and bought a ticket. Weekends might be a different story.

I can’t wait to see it again!

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